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A New Essays by Ernest Partridge

Bungling Toward Oblivion: 
A Letter to my Friends in Russia.
  

 

 


July 2, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

Editors'  Essays and bloGS


Notable Quotable

If you are English and someone says to you: "The French are your brothers," your first instinctive feeling will be: "Nonsense, they shrug their shoulders and talk French. And I am even told that they eat snails." If he explains to you that we may have to fight the Russians, that, if so, it will be desirable to defend the line of the Rhine, and that, if the line of the Rhine is to be defended, the help of the French is essential, you will begin to see what he means when he says that the French are your brothers. But if some fellow-traveler were to go on to say that the Russians also are your brothers, he would be unable to persuade you, unless he could show that we are in danger from the Martians.

Bertrand Russell
Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech, 1950
 


The Crisis Papers editors, Drs. Weiner & Partridge, are available for public speaking appearances.


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Ernest Partridge

NEW:   Bungling Toward Oblivion:  A Letter to my Friends in Russia.   Recent tensions between the United States and Russia portend a renewal of  the Cold War.  However, this is no time for despair. Rather it is a time for a renewed determination of men and women of good will on both sides to resist this drift toward confrontation, and to strive to restore the brief moment of friendship, respect and mutual cooperation that we experienced scarcely a decade ago.

REPRISE:   Russia: An Appreciation.    "Russia bashing," a favorite pastime of media and politicians a generation ago, is back in style.  The consequences could be deadly.  Here is an antidote, based upon common historical knowledge and on personal experience.

Thinking Like a Russian.  The rule is as old as human war and conflict: If you are to prevail, you must know the mind of your adversary. Accordingly, if the current conflict with Russia over Ukraine and Crimea is to end peacefully, both sides must diligently strive to understand the minds and motivations of their opponents.

Conscience of a Progressive.
A Book in Progress
 


Bernard Weiner: 

NEW:   Cutting Through Fukushima Fog: Radiation in U.S.?  If the reactor-meltdown disaster at the Dai-ichi nuclear plant in Fukushima is as dire as much of the evidence suggests -- a "ticking time bomb" now with more radiation crossing the Pacific by air and ocean -- what can the U.S. and international community do to mitigate the worst effects?

REPRISE:   Drifting Toward Catastrophe: A Seven-Headed Beast:.  "This country, humanity, the globe are rushing pell-mell to disaster, mostly by neglecting what needs to be done while we're diddling with the political minutiae. This tendency to avoid the obvious larger questions reminds one of the thrust of Albert Einstein's famous quote: "The unleashed power of the atom has changed everything save our modes of thinking and we thus drift toward unparalleled catastrophe." (First posted January 26, 2010)



Guest Essay: Reid Tanaka:
Shedding Some Light on the Fukushima Fog

Archive of Guest Essays



Ernest Partridge's Blog:  Climate Change: The Debate Continues.

Bernard Weiner's Blog:  A series of encounters over the weekend emphasized the necessity and strength of community and the principle of the "public good," a concept that is anathema to so many conservative Republicans.  All that plus George Clooney in "Up in the Air.